Mostrar el registro sencillo del ítem

dc.contributor.authorPiedrahita-Valdés, Hilary
dc.contributor.authorPiedrahita Castillo, Diego (1)
dc.contributor.authorBermejo-Higuera, Javier (1)
dc.contributor.authorGuillem-Saiz, Patricia
dc.contributor.authorBermejo Higuera, Juan Ramón (1)
dc.contributor.authorGuillem-Saiz, Javier
dc.contributor.authorSicilia, Juan Antonio (1)
dc.contributor.authorMachío-Regidor, Francisco (1)
dc.date2021-01
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-30T10:42:20Z
dc.date.available2021-04-30T10:42:20Z
dc.identifier.issn2076-393X
dc.identifier.urihttps://reunir.unir.net/handle/123456789/11270
dc.description.abstractVaccine hesitancy was one of the ten major threats to global health in 2019, according to the World Health Organisation. Nowadays, social media has an important role in the spread of information, misinformation, and disinformation about vaccines. Monitoring vaccine-related conversations on social media could help us to identify the factors that contribute to vaccine confidence in each historical period and geographical area. We used a hybrid approach to perform an opinion-mining analysis on 1,499,227 vaccine-related tweets published on Twitter from 1st June 2011 to 30th April 2019. Our algorithm classified 69.36% of the tweets as neutral, 21.78% as positive, and 8.86% as negative. The percentage of neutral tweets showed a decreasing tendency, while the proportion of positive and negative tweets increased over time. Peaks in positive tweets were observed every April. The proportion of positive tweets was significantly higher in the middle of the week and decreased during weekends. Negative tweets followed the opposite pattern. Among users with ≥2 tweets, 91.83% had a homogeneous polarised discourse. Positive tweets were more prevalent in Switzerland (71.43%). Negative tweets were most common in the Netherlands (15.53%), Canada (11.32%), Japan (10.74%), and the United States (10.49%). Opinion mining is potentially useful to monitor online vaccine-related concerns and adapt vaccine promotion strategies accordinglyes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherVaccineses_ES
dc.relation.ispartofseries;vol. 9; nº 1
dc.relation.urihttps://www.mdpi.com/2076-393X/9/1/28es_ES
dc.rightsopenAccesses_ES
dc.subjectvaccine hesitancyes_ES
dc.subjectvaccinationes_ES
dc.subjectopinion mininges_ES
dc.subjectsentiment analysises_ES
dc.subjectcontent analysises_ES
dc.subjectmachine learninges_ES
dc.subjectsocial mediaes_ES
dc.subjectTwitteres_ES
dc.subjectJCRes_ES
dc.titleVaccine Hesitancy on Social Media: Sentiment Analysis from June 2011 to April 2019es_ES
dc.typeArticulo Revista Indexadaes_ES
reunir.tag~ARIes_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9010028


Ficheros en el ítem

FicherosTamañoFormatoVer

No hay ficheros asociados a este ítem.

Este ítem aparece en la(s) siguiente(s) colección(ones)

Mostrar el registro sencillo del ítem