Mostrar el registro sencillo del ítem

dc.contributor.authorCachay, Edward R.
dc.contributor.authorMena, Alvaro
dc.contributor.authorMorano, Luis
dc.contributor.authorBenitez, Laura
dc.contributor.authorMaida, Ivana
dc.contributor.authorBallard, Craig
dc.contributor.authorSoriano, Vicente (1)
dc.contributor.author...et al.
dc.contributor.authorMathews, Wm. C.
dc.date2019-03
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-07T07:45:09Z
dc.date.available2019-06-07T07:45:09Z
dc.identifier.issn2328-8957
dc.identifier.urihttps://reunir.unir.net/handle/123456789/8402
dc.description.abstractBackground. Little is known about the influence of ongoing barriers to care in the persistence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) viremia after treatment with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLWH). Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of PLWH treated through the standard of care in 3 Western countries, to investigate the predictors of HCV treatment failure (clinical or virologic), defined as having a detectable serum HCV ribonucleic acid within 12 weeks after DAA discontinuation. In addition to HCV and liver-related predictors, we collected data on ongoing illicit drug use, alcohol abuse, mental illness, and unstable housing. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors of HCV treatment failure. Results. Between January 2014 and December 2017, 784 PLWH were treated with DAA, 7% (n = 55) of whom failed HCV therapy: 50.9% (n = 28) had a clinical failure (discontinued DAA therapy prematurely, died, or were lost to follow-up), 47.3% (n = 26) had an HCV virologic failure, and 1 (1.8%) was reinfected with HCV. Ongoing drug use (odds ratio [OR] = 2.60) and mental illness (OR = 2.85) were independent predictors of any HCV treatment failure. Having both present explained 20% of the risk of any HCV treatment failure due to their interaction (OR = 7.47; P < .0001). Predictors of HCV virologic failure were ongoing illicit drug use (OR = 2.75) and advanced liver fibrosis (OR = 2.29). Conclusions. People living with human immunodeficiency virus with ongoing illicit drug use, mental illness, and advanced liver fibrosis might benefit from enhanced DAA treatment strategies to reduce the risk of HCV treatment failure.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherOpen Forum Infectious Diseaseses_ES
dc.relation.ispartofseries;vol. 6, nº 3
dc.relation.urihttps://academic.oup.com/ofid/article/6/3/ofz070/5315621es_ES
dc.rightsopenAccesses_ES
dc.subjectDAAes_ES
dc.subjectdrug usees_ES
dc.subjectHCV treatment failurees_ES
dc.subjectHIVes_ES
dc.subjectmental illnesses_ES
dc.subjectJCRes_ES
dc.subjectScopuses_ES
dc.titlePredictors of Hepatitis C Treatment Failure After Using Direct-Acting Antivirals in People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Viruses_ES
dc.typeArticulo Revista Indexadaes_ES
reunir.tag~ARIes_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1093/ofid/ofz070


Ficheros en el ítem

FicherosTamañoFormatoVer

No hay ficheros asociados a este ítem.

Este ítem aparece en la(s) siguiente(s) colección(ones)

Mostrar el registro sencillo del ítem